Peanut Oil

There are certain factors to consider before using peanut oil, especially for cooking. If used in moderation and in its unheated form, peanut oil can have a multitude of benefits for your health. This edible oil is a natural tonic that helps boost immunity and invigorate your entire body.

A sweet and flavorful edible oil, peanut oil, also called groundnut oil, is made from Arachis hypogea, a low-growing, annual plant that is the lone member of the Fabaceae (Leguminosae) family. Despite the word “nut” in its name, peanut is actually a legume and grows underground, as opposed to other nuts like walnuts and almonds, which grow on trees (hence are called tree nuts).

Peanut oil is currently one of the most popular oils used in the kitchen, as it can be used for frying, sautéing, or simply adding a mild nutty flavor to dishes.

If used in moderation and in its unheated form, peanut oil can have a multitude of benefits for your health. This edible oil is a natural tonic that helps boost immunity and invigorates your entire body. It has high levels of polyphenol antioxidants that help eliminate free radicals, which cause chronic diseases such as cancer and Alzheimer’s disease.

Resveratrol, one of the potent antioxidants in peanut oil, can also interact with various hormones such as angiotensin, which helps constrict blood vessels and arteries, decreasing blood pressure and reducing stress on your cardiovascular system. Peanut oil may also provide benefits to your heart because of its monounsaturated fatty acid content (oleic acid), which help lower your bad cholesterol levels while increasing your good cholesterol.

This helps prevent cardiac-related ailments, such as coronary artery disease, heart attacks, strokes, and atherosclerosis. If applied topically, peanut oil may help promote skin health, as it is rich in vitamin E. It also protects against free radicals that cause wrinkles, blemishes, and other signs of premature aging.